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Walking Sticks and leaf insects

Walking Sticks and leaf insects Acrophylla titan, aptly named the titan stick insect or the great brown phasma, is the longest Australian species. The females are generally much larger than the males and are abundant egg layers. Two captive females were observed to lay over 4,000 eggs between them during their lifetime. Body length up to 10 inches (25 cm).

Walking Sticks and leaf insects Facts:

Common name: Walkingsticks (stick insects), leaf insects, timemas

Order: Phasmatodea (Phasmida)

Class Insecta

Subphylum: Hexapoda

Number of species: About 2,500 (32 US) Size From about 0.5 in (13 mm) to 13 in (33 cm)

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Key features: Body shape anything from short and broad in leaf insects to very long and thin in Walkingsticks; antennae slim, very variable in length; compound eyes fairly small simple eyes in flying species but often only present in the male; wings (when present) usually only full size in males, many species wingless in both sexes, forewings leathery to protect hind wings nymphs resemble adults, but are wingless

Habits: Almost all species sit around on vegetation and are active at night

Breeding: Courtship mainly absent, many males guard female during egg laying; eggs dropped anywhere or inserted into crevices

Diet: All species feed on living vegetation of some kind

Habitat: Forests, grassy areas, scrub, semidesert, and desert

Distribution: Worldwide, but most common in the tropics; absent from cool, temperate regions.

Walking Sticks and leaf insects Photos and Pics:

 

Walking Sticks and leaf insects Facts with Images Walking Sticks and leaf insects Facts with Photos

Walking Sticks and leaf insects

Walking Sticks and leaf insects Facts with Pics

Walking Sticks and leaf insects Facts and Images

Walking Sticks and leaf insects Pics

Leaf insects

Walking Sticks and leaf insects Facts with Pictures

Walking Sticks and leaf insects Facts

Walking Sticks and leaf insects Pics

Walking Sticks and leaf insects Pictures Walking Sticks and leaf insects

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